Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Lucas County's Civil War dead


The Iowa Soldiers and Sailors Monument, completed during 1894-96, is the largest and most elaborate of the state’s tributes to those who served and died. It is located just south of the state capitol building in Des Moines (photo taken June 1, 2008).

This is the beginning of an effort to account for Lucas County’s Civil War dead. Although I’ve been working at it for some time, the post coincides with the beginning of the first sesquicentennial year of that most costly of our wars.

Only a few names at the beginning of the alphabetical sequence are here now, but that number will grow as the year advances. I currently have preliminary information about 125 Lucas County men who died, and there are considerably more to be tracked down. There is no single source or master database to go to, so it all takes time.

Iowa was sparsely settled when the Civil War began --- total population of roughly 675,000. More than 76,000 Iowa men served, the largest per capita contribution of any state to the Union effort. Of the 76,000, 13,000 died.

Roughly a third of Iowa’s losses were sustained in combat; the remainder died of disease or infection. And nearly all were buried where they died and remain there.

Some families sustained terrible losses. Among just these few names here now are those of two sets of brothers. The story of two of my Lucas County uncles, half-brothers James M. Rhea and Robert Etheredge, is not that uncommon. Robert, who idolized his elder brother, lied about his age to enlist at 16 and died of disease at 17. Jim died of wounds sustained at Vicksburg.

The memories of many of these men are nearly extinguished. Baley Chaney, for example --- post office Lagrange but a resident of Cedar Township’s Ireland neighborhood --- enlisted at 18 and was severely wounded in the foot at Shiloh. Sent home to recuperate --- or die --- he died and most likely was buried in what now is Bethel Cemetery. After the war, his family moved on, his grave was not marked and no one was left to tell his story.

As this project continues, anyone with input is welcome to contact me by commenting on this post or by e-mail (you’ll find that address under “view my complete profile”).

A

ABLES, JOHN B., age 18 at enlistment, of English Township, Private, Co. L, 9th Iowa Cavalry; enlisted 14 July 1863; died 15 August 1864 of chronic diarrhea at the Marine General Hospital, St. Louis; buried Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, St. Louis (Section 34, Site 3353).

John B., a son of Alexander and Lucy (Underwood) Ables, was born about 1845 in Illinois and was living with his family in Mount Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa, when the 1850 federal census was taken. By 1860, the family had moved to English Township, Lucas County (P.O. Chariton). Alexander was a carpenter by trade. John’s elder brother, Theodore (which see), who died aboard a hospital ship at St Louis on 2 or 3 June 1862, also was a Civil War fatality and also is buried at Jefferson Barracks. By 1870, Alexander and Lucy had returned to Mount Pleasant, then moved soon thereafter to Parsons in Labette County, Kansas, where she died 23 January 1878. Alexander died 31 March 1898. Both are buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Parsons.

ABLES, THEODORE, age 21 at enlistment, of English Township, Private, Co. K, 15th Iowa Infantry; enlisted at Knoxville 20 January 1862; mustered 13 February 1862; died 2 or 3 June 1862 of pneumonia aboard the hospital ship Louisiana at or near St. Louis; buried Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, St. Louis (Section 51, Site 759).

Theodore, son of Alexander and Lucy (Underwood) Ables and a native of Illinois, was living with his family in Mount Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa, in 1850. By 1860, the family had moved to English Township, Lucas County (P.O. Chariton). Alexander was a carpenter by trade. He enlisted at Knoxville and may or may not have been living there at the time. Theodore's younger brother, John (which see), also was a Civil War fatality and also is buried at Jefferson Barracks. Theodore is carried officially as a Marion County fatality because he enlisted there. He probably was a veteran of Shiloh, 6-7 April 1862. His remains were buried initially at Wesleyan Cemetery, St. Louis, then relocated upon establishment of Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. By 1870, Alexander and Lucy had returned to Mount Pleasant, then moved soon thereafter to Parsons in Labette County, Kansas, where she died 23 January 1878. Alexander died 31 March 1898. Both are buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Parsons.

ARMSTRONG, JOHN W., age 29 at enlistment, Fifth Sergeant (promoted Fourth Sergeant 10 January 1862), Co. B, 6th Iowa Infantry; wounded 6 April 1862 at Shiloh, died of wounds 8 May 1862 at Mound City, Ill; buried (perhaps) among the unknowns at Mound City National Cemetery. Nativity Illinois; residence at enlistment Chariton; enlisted 1 July 1861, mustered 17 July 1861. (Widow was Eliza J. Armstrong, later Eliza J. Kirsch.)

B

BADGER, JOHN WYANT., age 23 at enlistment, of rural Chariton; Private, Co. I, 8th Iowa Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 10 August 1861; mustered 10 August 1861; killed in action 6 April 1862 at Shiloh; buried among the unknowns at Shiloh National Military Park.

John, son of Ebenezer and Margaret (Wyant) Badger, was born 22 September 1838 in Grant County, Indiana, and came to Lucas County with his family during the fall of 1850, settling along the Mormon Trail just southeast of Chariton. He was living with his siblings when both the 1856 state and 1860 federal censes enumerations of Lucas County were made, occupation given as "farmer." By 1860, however, he owned $200 worth of real estate in his own right.

BARKER, VERLIN, age 30 at enlistment, Private, Co. E, 34th Iowa Infantry; died 27 March (or 1 April) 1863 at St. Louis of disease; buried Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery (Section 1, Number 7115). Nativity Indiana; residence Chariton; enlisted 20 August 1862; mustered 15 October 1862. There’s a good deal of confusion regarding Verlin. He apparently is buried at Jefferson Barracks under the name Verlin Barkley with death date given as 1 April 1863, but other records give as his death date 27 March 1863 which actually seems to be a “mustered out” date. Verlin’s widow, Martha E. Barker, with three minor children, Johnson Barker, John C. Barker and probably Cynthia Barker, received a pension after his death. Verlin Barker apparently is the Verlin “Baker” who married Martha Ellen Triggs on 19 December 1857 in Keokuk County.

BECHTOL, ABRAHAM, age 24 at enlistment, Private, Co. K, 34th Iowa Infantry; died 22 January 1863 of disease “on the steamer Iatan”; place of burial unknown. Son of Polly Bechtol, nativity Ohio, residence 1860 White Breast Township (post office Chariton), farmer, enlisted 11 August 1862, mustered 15 October 1862.

BELL, NELSON, age 26 at enlistment, Private, Co. B, 6th Iowa Infantry; died of disease Dec. 21 (or 20), 1862, at Camp Yocona, Miss.; place of burial unknown. Husband of Rebecca (Hobson) Bell/Plimpton, father of Cyrus Nelson Bell, Residence 1860 White Breast Township (post office Chariton), farmer, enlisted 11 September 1862, mustered 11 September 1862.

BOYCE, JOHN W., age 22 at enlistment, Private, Co. B, 6th Iowa Infantry; died of unspecified causes 3 November 1862 at Memphis, Tenn.; probably buried among the unknowns at Memphis National Cemetery. Son of John Harper and Nancy R. (Sanderson) Boyce, nativity Ohio, residence 1860 Union Township (post office Argo) in the household of John A. and Mary A. Sanders, farmer, enlisted 1 July 1861, mustered 17 July 1861. Note that John’s brother, Samuel (which see), also was a Civil War fatality.

BOYCE, SAMUEL, age 18 at enlistment, Private, Co. I, 8th Iowa Infantry; missing in action, wounded and taken prisoner 6 April 1862 at Shiloh; died 13 February 1863 of unspecified causes at St. Louis; buried Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery (apparently among the unknowns). Son of John Harper and Nancy R. (Sanderson) Boyce, nativity Ohio, residence 1860 White Breast Township (post office Chariton), enlisted 10 August 1861, mustered 12 September 1861. Note that Samuel’s brother, John (which see), also was a Civil War fatality.

BROCKWAY, LYNAS, age 22 at enlistment, Private, Co. B, 6th Iowa Infantry; died of disease 16 December 1862 at Memphis, Tenn.; buried among the unknowns at Memphis National Cemetery. A veteran of Shiloh and other engagements, Lynas died of chronic diarrhea. Son of Titus and Nancy Brockway, nativity Lee County, Iowa, living there with his widowed mother and siblings in 1860, enlisted 1 July 1861, mustered 17 July 1861. Commemorated on family tombstone in Fairview Cemetery, Washington Township, Lee County.

C

CALLAHAN, JOHN THOMAS, age 32 at enlistment, of Whitebreast Township; Private, Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 28 September 1861; mustered at Burlington 28 October 1861; died of disease (chronic diarrhea) 23 June 1862, U.S. General Hospital, Keokuk; buried Keokuk National Cemetery (Section B, Site 181).

John, a son of Jeremiah R. and Harriet (Leach) Callahan, was a native of Indiana, born 12 April 1829 in Johnson County. He married Mary Ellen Admire on 8 November 1849 in Brown County, Indiana. John and Mary apparently came west to Lucas County ca. 1855 with other extended family members. They had five sons --- Jeremiah R., born ca. 1853 in Indiana; James M., born 28 May 1857, Francis M., born 19 October 1859, Jacob, born 16 May 1861, and John Thomas Jr., born posthumously on 9 November 1862, all in Lucas County.

The family was living in Whitebreast Township, Lucas County, when both the 1856 state census and 1860 federal census were taken. John Apparently survived the Battle of Shiloh, but became ill soon thereafter and may have been transported upriver to Keokuk for treatment. 

Following John's death, Mary married as her second husband Philip Wolf on 23 May 1865 in Chariton and had three additional children, Eliza, George and Jesse, before being left a widow again prior to 1870. She married a third time, on 15 September 1878, to Evan Morgan Ward, then died on 30 January 1882 in Chariton. She was buried in the Chariton Cemetery.

CHANEY, BALEY, age 18 at enlistment, post office Lagrange; Private, Co. C, 13th Iowa Infantry; enlisted 28 September 1861; mustered 28 October 1861; died at home in Cedar Township, Lucas County, of wounds sustained at Shiloh 20 May 1862; perhaps buried in unmarked grave, Bethel Cemetery, Cedar Township.

Baley, born in Indiana, was living with his parents, Francis and Rachel Chaney, and siblings, in the Ireland neighborhood of Cedar Township when the 1856 and 1860 census enumerations were taken. The 1856 census suggests the family had moved from Indiana to Iowa ca. 1851. He enlisted 28 September 1861 and was mustered 28 October 1861. Severely wounded in a foot at Shiloh, he was sent home to recover or die --- and died. Later, Francis and Rachel and children moved from Iowa to Walnut Creek Township, Bates County, Missouri, where they were living when the 1870 census was taken.



CHRISTY, HENRY C., age 20 at enlistment, resident of Lucas County, Private, Co. G, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 14 August 1862, mustered 15 October 1862, received disability discharge 30 March 1863 at St. Louis, died at home in Lucas or Monroe County on 25 or 27 April 1863; buried Evans (aka Hannam) Cemetery, Jackson Township, Monroe County.

Henry, born in Indiana, was a son of the Rev. Isaac and Susannah Christy (or Christie). He was living with his parents and brother, William, on a farm near Gentryville, Gentry County, Missouri, when the 1860 census was taken. Isaac Christy, a supporter of the Union who was living and working in a hotbed of secessionist sympathies, reportedly was told to leave Gentry County in the fall of 1860 or risk losing his life. He brought his family to south central Iowa where he became affiliated with the Eden Baptist Association, a group of scattered Baptist churches in several counties, including Lucas. It isn’t known exactly where the Christys lived or which church or churches he served. Henry was among soldiers in Co. G, 34th Infantry, taken from the riverboat Sam Gaty on 25 Jan 1863 to a hospital on Arsenal Island, St. Louis, suffering from smallpox. He survived, but was discharged for disability and sent home where he died a few weeks later. His was buried in Evans Cemetery, located where the corners of Lucas, Monroe, Appanoose and Wayne counties meet and his name is inscribed on the Civil War memorial there. Isaac Christy died in 1865 and Susannah, in 1880. Both are buried, too, at Evans.


CHRISTY, JONATHAN, age 42 at enlistment, resident Lucas County; Private, Co. K, 36th Iowa Infantry; enlisted 17 October 1864, mustered 20 October1864, died of disease 24 December 1864 at Little Rock, Arkansas; buried Little Rock National Cemetery (Section 1, Site 285).

 Jonathan, a farmer born in Indiana, was living in Lick Creek Township, Davis County (post office Floris) with his second wife, Catharine, and children Alexander, William H., Mary E., George W. and Margaret J. when the 1860 census was taken. His first wife, Charlotte, had died during 1855 in Indiana. The Jonathan enlisted in Lucas County suggests the family had moved west soon thereafter. Far older than the usual recruit, Jonathan may have enlisted as part of an effort to reconstitute the 36th Iowa Infantry, three-fourths of whom had been killed or captured during the April 1864 Battle of Marks Mills, Arkansas. His daughter, Isabel, was born the year of his enlistment (and death) so he left eight children ranging in age from newborn to 15 behind. Following the war, the Christy family moved on to Kansas.


CARSON, HARVEY L., age 21 at enlistment, resident Chariton; Private, Co. K, 34th Iowa Infantry; enlisted 3 August 1862; mustered 15 October 1862; died 15 February 1863 of disease at St. Louis; buried initially at Christ Church Cemetery in St. Louis, reburied perhaps at Monmouth Cemetery, Harrison County, Illinois.

 A son of Franklin and Sarah (Hines) Carson, Harvey was born in Harrison County, Ohio, and reportedly was visiting his brother, John B. Carson, in Lucas County when he enlisted (two other Carson brothers, William F. and Isaac Newton, also settled in Lucas County). There is some confusion about where Harvey is buried. He definitely was among approximately 200 Union soldiers buried in Christ Church Cemetery in St. Louis, which later was closed and the remains removed. His name is not among those buried or reburied at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. However, both his service gravestone and an “in memory of” inscription on a family stone are located on the lot of Harvey’s uncle, Walter Carson, in the Monmouth Cemetery, Warren County, Illinois. So it is possible, but not certain, that the Illinois Carson family claimed Harvey’s body when it was disinterred at Christ Church Cemetery and took it upriver to Warren County.


COFFMAN, OLIVER W., age 29 at enlistment, resident of Chariton, Saddler, Co. C, First Iowa Cavalry; enlisted and mustered 31 August 1862; died of disease at home in Chariton on 26 December 1863, buried Douglass Cemetery.

Oliver, born in Ohio, had arrived in Chariton by 15 August 1855 when he married Elizabeth J. Ross. His residence as given in both 1856 and 1860 census records was the city of Chariton and his occupation, painter and plasterer. By 1860, Oliver and Elizabeth had a daughter, Dora, age 5. He enlisted in the First Iowa Cavalry at a time when it was engaged in campaigns in Arkansas and southwest Missouri. His final engagement would have been the Little Rock Campaign which ended when that city fell to Union forces on 10 September 1863. The unit, encamped near Little Rock during the following winter, sustained few casualties but was hit hard by illness. A victim of “chronic diarrhea,” he was sent home to Chariton to recuperate or die --- and died. He was buried in what now is called the Douglass Pioneer Cemetery and a fragment of his tombstone is mounted in the memorial area of that cemetery although his grave has been lost. Elizabeth married John Alexander at Chariton on 9 April 1867 and they apparently left the area.

COLVER, GEORGE B., age 30 at enlistment, of Cedar Township (post office Lagrange); Private, Co. K, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 9 August 1862, mustered 15 October 1862, died of smallpox 6 February 1863 at Mound City, Ill.; probably buried Mound City National Cemetery.

George, a son of Edmond and Sarah (Brotherton) Colver, was born in Greene County, Ohio, but had arrived in Lucas County with his family prior to 1850. He married Mary Margaret Sellers 30 October 1851 and they farmed in Lucas County for 11 years. There were six children: Sarah Margaret (Parkin), James Joseph, Susan L. (Wood), Douglas and Johnson (twins) and Georgeanna (born posthumously). 

George was a member of the 34th Iowa’s initial muster at Burlington and served with it in early engagements in Arkansas. During the period 17 January through 5 February, 1863, the 34th Iowa was assigned to escort prisoners of war from Arkansas to Chicago. George apparently became ill while thus deployed and was taken from a river boat and hospitalized at Mound City, Ill., when he died on 6 February. There is no record of George’s burial in the Mound City National Cemetery, but he most likely is there among more than 2,400 “unknowns.” 

Mary Margaret did not remarry. She continued to live in Cedar Township until her own death on 4 August 1901. She is buried in Bethel Cemetery.


D

DAVENPORT, NELSON, age 24 at enlistment, resident Lucas County but no other record of him found here, Private, Co. G, 34th Volunteer Iowa Infantry, enlisted 12 August 1862, mustered at Burlington 15 October 1862, died of smallpox 20 February 1863 at St. Louis.

Nelson was among soldiers from Company G taken from the riverboat Sam Gaty on 25 January 1863 to a hospital on Arsenal Island, suffering from smallpox (his unit was engaged in transporting prisoners of war). He died on 20 February 1863, presumably at that hospital and was buried nearby. His unidentified remains were transferred later to Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Born in Ohio, Nelson was married to Rebecca, who was living in Oskaloosa with children when he wrote a surviving letter to her on Nov. 25, 1863. Samuel Shepherd, who received a dependent's pension, may have been a stepson.

DAWSON, ZADOCK, age 19 at enlistment; Private, Co. K, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 9 August 1862 Chariton; mustered 15 October 1862 at Burlington; died of disease 9 February 1863 at St. Louis; buried as “unknown” in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

Zadock, eldest son of Thomas S. and Elizabeth (Prickett) Dawson, was born in Grant County, Indiana, ca. 1843 and came with his family to Whitebreast Township, Lucas County, in 1855. His occupation was given as farmer in the 1860 census and at 17 he was living with his parents and six younger siblings, William, Solomon, John, Henry, Austin and Rosanne. His father enlisted on 30 July 1862 as a private in Company K, as did Zadock on 9 August. They were mustered together and shipped downriver, but Zadock became ill and was hospitalized in St. Louis, where he died six months after enlisting. His unidentifiable remains were collected after the war and reburied in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. His father served until war’s end.

DAY, AMRAH, age 21 at enlistment; First Sergeant, Co. K, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 30 July 1862 Chariton; mustered 15 October 1862 at Burlington; died of disease 19 January 1863 at Memphis, Tennessee; buried (as “unidentified”) Memphis (aka Mississippi River) National Cemetery.

Amrah probably was a son of William and Julia (Perry) Day, born 6 February 1842 in Belmont County, Ohio, who came west to join his uncle, Henry H. Day, who was living during 1860 in Jackson Township, Lucas County, with his wife, Rebecca, and children Mahlon and Jessie. Amrah survived Shilohand other engagements, but died of disease the following January at Memphis, Tenn. Several sources state that he is buried in the Memphis National Cemetery, but no marked grave exists for him there. Most likely, he rests among the “unknowns.”

DIXON, JAMES, age 22 at enlistment; Private, Co. B, 6th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 7 October 1861; mustered 7 October 1861; died of pneumonia 25 December 1861 at Sedalia, Missouri; probably buried at Jefferson City National Cemetery.

James was a son of Isaac and Rebecca Dixon who had moved west with his father and stepmother, Nancy, to Chariton Township, Lucas County, ca. 1855. He was living there with his family, including a full brother, Jesse, and six half-siblings when the 1860 census was taken, occupation given as farmer. The 6th Iowa, deployed in Missouri, had yet to have combat experience when James died at Sedalia, Missouri, on Christmas day, 1861. His remains most likely were reinterred some years after death at Jefferson City National Cemetery, but if so he rests there among the “unknowns.”


DOOLEY, CHARLES LEWIS, age 19 at enlistment, Private, Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, killed in combat April 6, 1862, at the Battle of Shiloh, buried Shiloh National Cemetery, 13th Iowa Section, Grave No. 493.

Charles was born ca. 1845 in Jackson County, (West) Virginia, and by 1855 had moved west with his family to Union Township, Lucas County. About 1860, the family moved very briefly to Iowa Point Township, Doniphan County, Kansas, but were living in Lucas County again by the fall of 1861 when both Charles and his father, Jonathan, enlisted as privates in Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry. Charles was killed in combat on April 6, 1862, during the battle of Shiloh. His father, having survived the battle, died a month later of dysentery at a military hospital in Keokuk.


 DOOLEY, JOHN WESLEY, age 40 at enlistment, Private, Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, died May 28 or 29, 1862, of dysentery at a military hospital in Keokuk, Iowa. Buried Keokuk National Cemetery, Section C, Site 52.

Jonathan, born March 10, 1821, probably in Kanawha County, (West) Virginia, married Mary Fisher Oct. 18, 1844, in Jackson County, (West) Virginia, where their three oldest children --- Charles Lewis, William Monroe and Rebecca Mahala, were born. Ca. 1855, the family moved to Union Township, Lucas County, where they were living when the 1856 state census was taken. Daughters Sarah Ann and Hester Ellen were born here. Ca. 1859, the family moved to Iowa Point Township, Doniphan County, in extreme northeast Kansas Territory, but remained only briefly. By 1861, the Dooleys were living in Lucas County again. On Sept. 28, 1861, both Jonathan and his son, Charles L., enlisted as privates in Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and they were mustered in together at Davenport on Oct. 28. The 13th sustained substantial losses at the Battle of Shiloh on April 5-6, 1862. Charles was killed in combat on April 6. Jonathan survived, but died of dysentery at a military hospital in Keokuk a few weeks later, on May 28 or 29 (records vary, but Keokuk National Cemetery records show May 28). The widowed Mary Dooley was living with other family members in near Chelsea in Poweshiek County during 1870, but the family moved soon thereafter back to Luas County. Mary reportedly died at Chariton on Aug. 11, 1873, but there is no record of her burial here. Reports that she was buried with Jonathan at Keokuk are in error.


DUCKWORTH, JACOB ASBURY, age 28 at enlistment, Private, Co. F, 36th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 28 March 1864; mustered 24 April 1864; died of disease 1 June 1864 at Little Rock, Arkansas; buried Section 2, Site 1591, Little Rock National Cemetery.

Jacob was a native of Indiana, son of John M. and Sophia (Peck) Duckworth, who married Elizabeth Foster June 19, 1856, in Lucas County. Jacob and Elizabeth were living in Pleasant Township where he was employed as a carpenter when the 1860 census was taken. They had four children ranging in age from 7 to 2 --- Lewis M., Andrew O., Harriett R. and Matilda F. --- when Jacob enlisted. Disease claimed his life little more than two months later. Elizabeth did not remarry. She died 10 February 1931 and was buried in Zion Cemetery where his name also is inscribed on the family tombstone.


E

EASTER, JACOB, age 21 at enlistment, Private, Co. G, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 11 August 1862; mustered 15 October 1862; died of smallpox 29 January 1863 at St. Louis. Buried Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery (among the "unknowns").

Jacob, born ca. 1841 in Jennings County, Indiana, was a son of George Easter and his first wife, Eliza. They moved west during the 1850s to Monroe County, where Eliza died. George then married his second wife, Mary. When the 1850 federal census was taken, the family was living in Jackson Township, Monroe County. Jacob's home county is given as Lucas in military records, but his family continued to live in Monroe County. Fellow Lucas Countyan William Goltry noted in a diary entry that Jacob was among six smallpox-stricken soldiers of Company G, 34th Iowa, removed on Jan. 25, 1862, at St. Louis, to the hospital on "Smallpox Island" from the ship the unit was using to escort prisoners upriver. He died there four days later and would have been buried nearby. After the war his remains, by then unidentifiable, were removed to Jefferson Barracks. Jacob is, however, commemorated on the Civil War memorial in Evans Cemetery, located at the "four corners," where Monroe, Lucas, Appanoose and Wayne counties join.


EDWARDS, ABEL T., age 22 at enlistment, of Otter Creek Township, Private, Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 28 September 1861 at Chariton, mustered 28 October 1861; critically wounded 6 April 1861 at the Battle of Shiloh; died of wounds 20 April 1862, 4th Street Military Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio; buried military section of Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati (right); commemorated at Clore-Wells Pioneer Cemetery, Otter Creek Township, Lucas County, Iowa (left).

Abel, a son of Abel T. Edwards Sr. and Lucy E. (Bennett) Edwards, was 23 when he was killed. Here's the biographical paragraph composed by a relative, "Kathy S.," for his Find-A-
Grave memorial: "Abel enlisted in Co. C, 13th Iowa Infantry, 28 Sept 1861. The company was formed in Lucas Co. Iowa, and included several men from the Norwood area including Elias Mills, who later married Abel's sister, Elizabeth. They (were) mustered into service 28 Oct 1861 at Keokuk, Iowa. The men spent the winter in camp at Jefferson City, Missouri, where three died of disease. On 6 April 1862, the company experienced it's first and bloodiest battle --- Shiloh, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee) --- under Ulysses S. Grant. Abel was shot in the lungs and removed to the 4th Street Military Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. He survived the wound for two weeks."

ETHREDGE, ROBERT, age 16 at enlistment, of Cedar Township, Lucas County; Private, Co. F, 36th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 9 August 1862 at Iconium (Appanoose County); mustered 4 October 1862; discharged for disability 20 February 1863, Helena, Arkansas; died at home in Cedar Township on 9 April 1863, age 17; buried Bethel Cemetery.

Robert, born 24 January 1846 in Jefferson County, Iowa, was the third of four children born to Elizabeth (Rhea) Rhea and her second husband, Thomas Etheredge. Elizabeth also had three children from her first marriage to a Sangamoun County, Illinois, farmer and preacher named Richard Rhea. They were Mary, Elizabeth Rachel and James M. Rhea. The Etheredge family moved west to the Lucas-Marion county line south of Columbia ca. 1851, then during 1854 to Cedar Township, where they lived just east of what became Bethel Cemetery --- the oldest part of which was on their farm.

Robert's elder brother, James Rhea, enlisted for service in Company I, Eighth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and perhaps to emulate him, Robert lied about his age (he said he was 19) and on 9 August 1862 enlisted at Inconium in Co. F, 36th Iowa Volunteer Infantry. Plagued by illness through the following months he finally became so ill that on 20 February 1863 he was discharged for disability at Helena, Arkansas. He managed to make it home where he died less that two months later, on 9 April 1863, age 17. He was buried in Bethel Cemetery. Three months later, on 25 July 1863, his brother, James, died of wounds at Vicksburg.

EVANS, JAMES CUNNINGHAM., age 36 at enlistment, of Washington Township, Lucas County; Private, Co. F. 36th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 9 August 1862; mustered 4 October 1862; died of acute dysentery 6 August, 1864, Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas. Buried Little Rock National Cemetery, Section 2, Site 1894.

James, like many of his Lucas County neighbors, was an Indiana native, born 19 February 1826. He married Sarah Hancock, daughter of Henry Henderson Hancock and his second wife, Mary "Polly" Gaithrite, on 6 April 1848 in Owen County, Indiana. She had been born there on 26 April 1830. The newlyweds lived at first in Owen County where their two eldest sons were born, William H. on 9 July 1849 and James P. on 17 August 1851. By the time the third son, David Owen, was born on 2 August 1854 they had moved west to Iowa. Marion Putnam Evans completed their family on 17 May 1861. By 1860, the family was living near Greenville in Washington Township, Lucas County.


James, who enlisted when his youngest was little more than a year old, was serving with his unit in Little Rock, Arkansas, when he became critically ill with acute dysentery during July 1864. He was taken to the U.S. General Hospital in Little Rock on 29 July and died there on 6 August.

Sarah remained a window for four years, then on 29 March 1868 married a longtime neighbor, Philip Heck, at her home near LaGrange. Philip, also an Indiana native, had married Susannah Steinebarger, daughter of Isaac and Anna, in Shelby County on 9 September 1852. They accompanied her parents west to Greenville in Lucas County ca. 1854, where Isaac became the village blacksmith. Philip and Susannah had no children and she died on 1 July 1867 at age 36 and was buried beside her father and a sister in Greenville Cemetery. Philip, Sarah and the Evans children were living at Greenville in 1870, then prior to 1880 relocated to Webster County. At some point between 1885 and 1900, Sarah and Philip moved to Manhattan in Riley County, Kansas, where she died 24 April 1910 and he died 8 December 1920. Both are buried in Sunset Cemetery, Manhattan.

EVANS, WILLIAM A., age 37 at enlistment, of Chariton; Private, Co. K, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 9 August 1862; mustered 15 October 1862; died of disease 18 March 1863 at Memphis, Tennessee; no information available about disposition of remains, perhaps buried among "unknowns" at Memphis National Cemetery.

William may have been a native of Indiana, born ca. 1830, but the circumstances of his arrival in Chariton and the details of his life here are elusive. We do know, however, that he married Sarah Ann Anderson, age 20, on the 24th of November, 1853, at the home of Vincent Anderson in Lucas County. They were living or visiting in Putnam County, Indiana, when their only child, Martha Ellen, was born on 30 January 1860, but returned to Chariton a few months later. Sarah Ann died in Chariton on 23 December 1861.

William left Martha Ellen in custody of relatives, perhaps James Anderson who was later appointed her guardian, when he enlisted in Co. K, 24th Iowa Volunteer Infantry of 9 August 1862. During the winter of 1862-63, William was stationed at Youngs Point near Vicksburg, Mississippi, in charge of a team of horses, when he became ill (his commanding officer, Capt. William Boyle, testified later that William had been ailing when placed in charge of the team). He developed pneumonia and was taken to the military hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, where he died on 18 March 1863. Boyle added to his affidavit that he had visited William's grave in Memphis although that grave cannot now be located.

Little Martha was taken from Chariton to Albia and placed in the care of her uncle, Col. Daniel Anderson, and then her aunt, Mrs. Casper (Lucinda Anderson) Dull. She remained with the Dulls until her marriage on 8 June 1878 to George N. Ewers. She became mother to his four children from a previous marriage and went on to have three of her own. George died at Albia during January, 1918, and Martha died 30 September 1926, also at Albia, age 66. Both are buried in Oakview Cemetery, Albia.

F

FANSHER, SAMUEL M., age 26 at enlistment, of Chariton; 7th Corporal, Co. K, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 21 July 1862 at Chariton; mustered 15 October 1862 at Camp Lauman, Burlington; died of pneumonia 8 February 1863, most likely aboard the hospital ship City of Memphis, bound for a military hospital upriver from Vicksburg, Mississippi; disposition of remains unknown.

Samuel was a native of Indiana, born ca. 1836 --- but little is known of his background. He was living in Linn County, Kansas, when he married Elizabeth (Goodpasture) Ford  on 3 March 1859. She was a daughter of Hamilton and Hannah Goodpasture and had arrived in Linn County with her parents and first husband, Tom Ford, from Sangamon County, Illinois, a few years earlier. Ford died during 1857. Samuel and Elizabeth were residents of Poe Township, Linn County, with their first child, Lloyd Watson Fansher, when the 1860 federal census was taken, his occupation listed as farmer. Daughter Kate Ellen Fansher was born two years later.

At some point between 1860 and 1862, the Fanshers arrived at Chariton, but it isn't known what drew them here. After enlistment and muster, Samuel served honorably with his unit until late January or early February, 1863, when he contracted a cold that "settled in his lungs" while stationed at Vicksburg. His commanding officer dispatched him to an upriver military hospital, apparently aboard the hospital ship City of Memphis, where he died. Disposition of remains is unknown.

Elizabeth applied for a widow's pension while living at Chariton after Samuel's death, but by 1867 was living in Valley Township, Polk County. She had settled in Lane County Oregon by 1873 when she married G.W. Wilson as her second husband on 22 January of that year. Elizabeth Wilson died 30 August 1925 in South Bend, Washington.


FINLEY, DAVID, age 28 at enlistment, of Warren Township, Lucas County; 4th Sergeant (promoted to full sergeant 1 May 1863), Co. E, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 9 August 1862, mustered at Camp Lauman, Burlington, 15 October 1862; died aboard hospital ship City of Memphis off Vicksburg, Mississippi, 9 July 1863; disposition of remains unknown.

David, among the younger in a family of 16 children, was born 29 April 1834 in Monroe County, Indiana, where he married Julia Ann Dillman on 21 May 1854. They arrived in Lucas County during 1855 and were living in Liberty Township, not far from the current Oakley, when the 1856 state census was taken. By 1860, they had moved south into Warren Township and had a Chariton post office address. The Finleys had four children, all born in Lucas County --- Frances Emeline, born ca. 1856, who died young; Sarah Jane, born 12 October 1858; David E., born 1 September 1860; and Alice, born 1 June 1862, little more than a month before her father enlisted.

David served honorably with his unit, earning promotion from 4th to full sergeant during May of 1863, and was deployed at Vicksburg when he became ill during early July 1863. He was taken aboard the hospital ship City of Memphis for transport upriver to a military hospital, but died aboard ship on 9 July, reportedly not far from Vicksburg. Disposition of remains is unknown. The family apparently was told that he died of "inflammation of the brain caused by sunstroke" after military engagement. Official records list the cause of death as typhoid fever.

Julia Ann had returned to her family in Monroe County, Indiana, with her three surviving children prior to January, 1864, when she applied for a widow's pension. She married her second husband, Daniel Butcher, there on 28 March 1867. They had one son, Martin Luther Butcher, but Daniel died not long thereafter leaving Julia widowed for a second time. About 1882, she married as her third husband the widower James Douglas Finley, David Finley's younger brother. They eventually moved to Custer County, Nebraska, where Julia Ann died 17 November 1920. She is buried with J.D. Finley, who survived until 1934, in Mount Hope Cemetery at Sargent in Custer County.

FISHER, JOSEPH, age 20 at enlistment, of Washington Township, Lucas County; Private, Co. E, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 11 August 1862, mustered 15 October 1862 at Camp Lauman, Burlington; died of disease 14 or 15 February 1863 at St. Louis; buried Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Section 38, Grave No. 258.

Joseph, whose parents were Joseph Sr. and Catherine Fisher, was born ca. 1842 in Morrow County, Ohio. He had five siblings, older half-brother and half-sister, Maria (Row) Noble and Samuel S. Row and John, George and Catharine Fisher. His father was a native of England; his mother, of New York. By 1854, Maria and Samuel S. both had married and moved west to Chariton. The remainder of the family followed during 1855 and settled on a farm in Washington township where they were living when both the 1856 state and 1860 federal censuses were taken.

When Joseph's younger brother, George, died 11 January 1861 and his mother, Catherine, died a few months later, on 7 October 1861, age 55, their bodies were taken into Chariton for burial. These graves most likely were moved into the new Chariton Cemetery upon its establishment in 1863 and a large family stone (at left) erected. This stone also serves as a cenotaph for Joseph and bears the inscriptions of a total of nine family members. One of those inscription, on its north face and barely legible now, reads, "Joseph, died at St. Louis, Mo., Mar. 14, 1863, Aged 21 Ys."

The precise circumstances or cause of Joseph's death are unknown, but he most likely had been transported upriver from Vicksburg to St. Louis for medical treatment. There are varying dates of death. Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery records give the date as March 5; official records, as March 15; and his cenotaph in the Chariton Cemetery, as March 14.

FISHER, MILTON R, age 20 at enlistment, of Union Township, Private, Co. G., 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 12 August 1862 at Argo; mustered 15 October 1862 at Camp Lauman, Burlington; killed in combat 11 January 1863 during the assault on Arkansas Post, Arkansas; identifiable remains not recovered, but he may rest with the unknowns at Little Rock National Cemetery.

Milton was among the youngest of 11 or 12 children of Leonard (1789-1865) and Sarah (Casey) Fisher (1800-1855). He was born in Amelia County, Virginia, but came with parents and siblings to Union Township, Lucas County, in 1852. The family settled about a mile and a half south of the current location of Goshen Church and Cemetery where Sarah died in 1855 and became perhaps the first buried in Fisher-Webb Cemetery, along Highway 14. Milton, age 14, was living with his widowed father and four siblings at that location during 1856; and still was living at age 18 with his father when the 1850 census was taken. His occupation was given as farmer.


FODGE, DAVID. age 39 at enlistment, of Argo, Union Township, Private, Co. G., 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 10 August 1862; mustered at Camp Lauman, Burlington, 15 October 1862; died 19 February 1863 at the Convalescent Hospital, Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Missouri, of pneumonia and pleurisy; buried Benton Barracks National Cemetery, Section 50, Site No. 626.

David was an Ohio native, born 24 November 1822 in Lawrence County. By 1844, he had moved to Delaware County, Indiana, where he married Martha Jane Mansfield on 28 November of that year. Martha and David became the parents of five children while living in Delaware County --- James M., Eliza Jane, Rebecca Ann, John Riley and Eolina Ursula. During the fall of 1853, the family moved west, first to Allamakee County, Iowa, and soon thereafter to Giard Township, Clayton County, west of McGregor, where they were living when the 1856 state census was taken. Their youngest child, Charles W., was born there.

During 1857, the family moved to southern Iowa, locating near the Iowa-Missouri boarder in Howard Township, Wayne County, where they were living when the 1860 federal census was taken. Their daughter, Rebecca, died there on 6 June 1859 and was buried in the Medicineville Cemetery. Soon after 1860, they relocated again, this time to Union Township, Lucas County, where their post office was Argo.

David was 39 and described as 5 feet, 8 inches tall with fair skin, blue eyes and dark hair when he enlisted as a Private in Co. G, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, at Chariton on 10 August 1862. Somewhat confusingly, a Union Township neighbor with a similar name, David M. Fudge, had enlisted in the same unit a few days earlier. David Fudge would survive the war; David Fodge would not. 

The unit mustered at Camp Lauman in Burlington on 15 October 1862 and David served honorably during engagements at Chickasaw Bayou, Mississippi, in December of 1862, and at Arkansas Post, Arkansas, during January of 1863. He reportedly became ill near St. Louis while escorting Confederate prisoners upriver after their surrender at Arkansas Post and was taken to the Convalescent Hospital at Benton Barracks, where he died.

Following David's death, Martha and her children returned to Wayne County, locating in Warren Township near the current town of Allerton, then soon after 1870 moved west into Nebraska to exercise veteran homestead rights extended to Martha and to her eldest son, James, a veteran of Co. H, 1st Iowa Volunteer Cavalry. She died in Custer County on 21 August 1899 and is buried at Broken Bow.

FRENCH, GEORGE W. age 23 at enlistment, of rural Chariton; Private, Co. C. 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 21 September 1861; mustered 28 October 1861 at Camp McClellan near Davenport; re-enlisted as a veteran 1 January 1863; severely wounded 20 July 1864 during the advance on Atlanta; died of that wound 23 November 1864, U.S. General Hospital Chattanooga, Tennessee; buried Chattanooga National Cemetery, Section G, Site No. 8439.

George, born ca. 1838 and a native of New York, was enumerated at age 22 in the 1860 federal census as a farm laborer living with James and Martha Marsh and family in Benton Township, southwest of Chariton. He enlisted 21 September 1861 at Chariton, was enrolled as a Private, Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, at Camp McClellan near Davenport on 24th October that year, then mustered on the 28th. Some records show that he was promoted to full corporal on 10 April 1862, but he is carried as a private on most records, including those related to his death.

George returned to Chariton on furlough during the early spring of 1864 and on 31 March married here Mary E. Courtney, age 20. Then had only a few days together before he returned to active duty and the union produced no children.

George was shot through a knee joint on 20 July1864 during the advance on Atlanta. That same day, Dr. William H. Gibbon, also of Chariton and surgeon attached to the 15th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, amputated the leg above the knee, then a few days later sent George to a military hospital at Rome, Georgia, to recuperate. When Gibbon visited George in the hospital three months later he discovered that the stump had "mortified" and a second amputation had been performed. By that time, however, George was suffering from septicemia. Transferred to Chattanooga, he died there as a result on 23 November.

Mary (Courtney) French married as her second husband William F. Cluster during 1868 after the Courtney family had relocated to Oregon. Mary and William relocated during 1871 to old Walla Walla County, Washington, where they took up a claim near the town of Pomeroy, where they became quite prosperous. He died during 1915 and she died on 6 November 1922 in Yakima, Washington, leaving a family of seven children. Both are buried in the Pomeroy City Cemetery.

G

GARDNER, LAMBERT B., age 21 at first enlistment, of Warren Township, Lucas County; Private, Co. B, 6th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, enlisted 1 July 1861, mustered 17 July 1861, mustered out because of disability 20 December 1861, Lamine Bridge, Missouri.

Age 22 at second enlistment, Private, Co. D, 23rd Iowa Volunteer Infantry, enlisted 23 August 1862, promoted immediately to full corporal, to 4th sergeant on 16 March 1863, and to 3rd sergeant on 11 April 1863; died of wounds 15 or 16 July 1863, Milliken's Bend, Louisiana; remains recovered and buried at Vicksburg National Cemetery, Section H, Site No. 68.

Lambert Bowman Gardner, a son of Joshua and Catharine (Neighbor) Gardner, was born ca. 1840 in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and arrived in Lucas County during 1859 with his brother-in-law and sister, Burris and Julia Ann (Gardner) Moore. They were living in Warren Township with a Chariton post office address when the 1860 federal census was taken. The Moores later moved to a farm in the New York area of Wayne County where the remainder of their lives were spent.

It's not known what sort of disability caused Lambert to be discharged from his first enlistment after only a few months, but most likely he returned to Chariton to recover, then enlisted again --- this time in Co. D, 23rd Iowa Volunteer Infantry, where he rose rapidly through the ranks. Co. D was engaged on June 7, 1863, in the Battle of Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, when he was shot in the right hip and arm. He was taken to Van Buren General Hospital on what formerly had been the Marshal Plantation in Madison Parish, Louisiana, where he died on 15 or 16 June. His remains initially were buried with many other Union dead in a graveyard on the plantation. They were recovered and identified during January of 1867 and reinterred at Vicksburg National Cemetery.

GARDNER, STEPHEN D., age 25 at enlistment, of Chariton; 1st Sergeant, Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 28 September 1861; mustered 28 October 1861; died of disease at Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee, 29 May 1862. Disposition of remains unknown, but most likely buried with the "unknowns" at Shiloh National Military Park.

Sadly, very little information is available about Stephen. He had arrived in Lucas County prior to 13 July 1860 when he was enumerated in the federal census of that year while living in Warren Township (post office Chariton) with Joel H. and Eliza (Threlkeld) Adams and Eliza's brother, Washington Threlkeld. Stephen was listed as age 23, a native of North Carolina and a carpenter. The Adams had arrived in Warren Township during 1855 and, according to Eliza's obituary (Chariton Leader, 15 April 1892), "For many years entertained travelers and were widely known and highly respected." Most likely Stephen was a paying guest in the Adams home and not a family member. There would have been plenty of work in nearby Chariton for a carpenter at that time.

The fact that Stephen was appointed 1st sergeant upon enlistment 28 September 1861 in Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, suggests --- but does not guarantee --- that he might have had previous military experience. He apparently survived the great battle of Shiloh (aka Pittsburg Landing) on April 6-8, 1862, but was reported to be in the vicinity of Pittsburg Landing when he died of unspecified disease on 29 May 1862. By that time, the 13th Iowa had been assigned to Third Brigade of the Sixth Division and totally engaged in the advance upon and siege of Corinth. There seems to be no record of the disposition of his remains, so there are puzzles here still to unravel.

GARDOVER, JOSEPH


GARTIN, CUMBERLAND W., age 16 at enlistment, of Washington Township, Wayne County, previously Warren Township, Lucas County; Private, Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 28 September 1861 at Chariton; mustered at Burlington 28 October 1861; re-enlisted and remustered 1 January 1864; wounded in left hand near Atlanta, Georgia, July 1864; reported missing in action and presumably killed 19 February 1865, Columbia, S.C.; identifiable remains never found.

Cumberland was a son of Allen and Mary A. (Webb) Gartin, born ca. 1845 in Gentry County, Missouri, where he was living with his mother and younger sibilings, Sarah and Parkinson, when the 1850 federal census was taken. Allen had followed the Gold Rush to California, reportedly returning home later with $500 in gold. Gentry County could be an uncomfortable place prior to the Civil War for those with union sympathies and this may have been a factor in the family's relocation to Warren Township, Lucas County, by 1856. By 1860, however, the family had moved to a farm in Washington Township, Wayne County, with the post office address Bethlehem. 

Cumberland lied about his age when he enlisted for service in Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, at Chariton on 28 September 1861. He survived his company's various engagements without incident until July, 1864, when he was wounded in the left hand near Atlanta. A few months later, as the war was winding down, he was reported missing in action and presumed dead after an engagement near Columbia, South Carolina, on 19 February 1865. Identifiable remains never were recovered.

His father, Allen, had enlisted in Co. I, 4th Iowa Cavalry, on 21 December 1863 and served until honorable discharge at Atlanta on 8 August 1865. After his return home, the family moved deep into Missouri, locating in the Wright-Texas county area in the far south central portion of the state. Mary died 15 October 1895 in Wright County and Allen, 13 January 1907, in Texas County. Both are buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Texas County.

GOLTRY, AARON H., age 33 at enlistment, of Cedar Township, Lucas County; Private, Co. G, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 12 August 1862; mustered 15 October 1862 at Burlington; died of malaria on 10 April (or 30 April) 1863 at the Marine Hospital, Chicago; buried Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago; cenotaph located in the Russell Cemetery, Lucas County.

Aaron, son of William and Alcemena (Heddon) Goltry, was born 14 February 1829 in Steuben County, New York, where he married on 10 September 1854 Sarah Landon. They arrived in Cedar Township, Lucas County, during December of 1854 and all of their children were born there: Anna Jeanette, 11 June 1855; Edwin Lewis, 19 April 1858; Emma Elizabeh, 6 May 1860; and Aaron William, on 22 February 1863, four months after his father's deployment.

Co. G was deployed along the lower Mississippi River until January-February, 1863, when it was assigned to escort prisoners of war to Chicago. Aaron apparently became critically ill with malaria while in Chicago and was taken to Marine Hospital, where he died during April. Military records give the date of death as 10 April; records related to his burial at Rosehill Cemetery give the date as 30 April.

On 7 December 1867, Sarah married as her second husband, David S. Force whose death on 19 January 1880 left her a widow for a second time. Her pension in Aaron's name was restored during the late 19th century and daughter Anna "Nettie" Goltry, disabled since her early teens, also was granted a "helpless child" pension during those years. Sarah died 6 August 1908 and was buried in the Russell Cemetery where a cenotaph commemorating Aaron also is located. This stone may have been moved to Russell from the Lagrange Cemetery.

GOODPASTURE, ANDREW, age 21 at enlistment, of rural Chariton; Private, Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 28 September 1861; mustered 28 October 1861; mustered out due to disability 1 August 1862, Keokuk; died 6 February 1868 at home in Warren County, Iowa, due to service-connected disability (tuberculosis); buried I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Indianola, Warren County.

GOODPASTURE, WILLIAM H., age 19 at enlistment, of rural Chariton; Corporal, Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 28 September 1861; mustered at Burlington 28 October 1861; died 9 August 1864 at Marietta, Cobb County, Georgia, of wounds sustained at the Battle of Ezra Church; buried Marietta National Cemetery.

GOOKIN, ALEXANDER
GRAY, ZABULON

H

HALL, JOHN
HANNON, WILLIAM
HARDIN, MONROE
HARVEY, JOHN
HESTER, ROBERT
HOLMES, FERGUS
HOLMES, OSCAR
HUGHES, WILLIAM
HUNT, CHARLES

I

ISEMINGER, DANIEL W., age 47 at enlistment, of Chariton; Captain, Co. B, 6th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted Lucas County Union Guards 3 May 1861 at Chariton and was elected captain; ordered into quarters 1 July 1861; mustered into U.S. service and commissioned Captain 17 July 1861 at Burlington; killed in combat while commanding the 6th Regiment on 6 April 1862 during the Battle of Pittsburg Landing/Shiloh; identifiable remains not recovered; buried with the "unknowns" at Shiloh National Cemetery.

Daniel William Iseminger, born 30 May 1813 in Butler County, Ohio, Ohio, moved as a child to Monroe County, Indiana, where he grew up. When he was 23, he married Susan (or Susannah) Ribble on 2 December 1836 in Jackson County, Indiana. Their only surviving child, George O., was born four years later, on 16 May 1841 at Bloomington.

During June of 1846, Daniel was mustered as a volunteer into Co. A, 3rd Indiana Infantry, as a corporal for service during the Mexican War, and saw action during the Battle of Buena Vista and other engagements before his honorable discharge. During 1855, Daniel, Susan and George relocated to Chariton, Lucas County, Iowa, where he entered the general mercantile business. Upon adoption of the town's first charter during February of 1857, he became the city's first mayor. 

Almost immediately after the outbreak of the Civil War, Daniel became principal recruiter and captain of the unit mustered into U.S. service on 17 July 1861 at Burlington as Co. B, 6th Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He was commissioned captain on the same date.

On the opening day of the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, or Shiloh, 6 April 1862, Daniel was placed in command of the 6th regiment after its former commanding officer, Lt. Col. Markoe Cummins, had been relieved of duty by Col. John A. McDowell for incompetence. He was leading his troops when shot and killed by a enemy sharpshooter. Identifiable remains were not recovered and so he rests among the "unknowns" at Shiloh National Cemetery.

Not long after Daniel's death, Susan joined her son in Indiana where he had been attending the University of Indiana at Bloomington. They settled together at Bedford, Indiana, where George practiced law for many years. Susan did not remarry and died at age 91 on April 6, 1907, the 45th anniversary of Daniel's death. She is buried at Green Hill Cemetery in Bedford. When the Chariton Grand Army of the Republic post was organized during October of 1878, it was named Daniel Iseminger Post No. 18 in his honor.

J

JAMES, LORENZO

K

KELLS, HILAS LINDLEY, age 18 at enlistment, of Lagrange; Private, Co. E, 6th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 1 July 1861; mustered 17 July 1861; wounded at Shiloh 6 April 1862; died St. John Hospital, Cincinnati, 24 or 26 April 1862; buried Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati (Section A, Grave 138). Also commemorated on the Evens Cemetery monument, Jackson Township, Monroe County, Iowa.

Hilas, born 23 April 1843 in Defiance County, Ohio, was a son of Robert and Lavina (Bay) Kells, but orphaned as a child. His mother died when he was 4 and his father, when he was 10. By the time the 1856 state census was taken, Hilas and three of his younger siblings were living with their uncle and aunt, Hilas and Lucy Bay, across the Des Moines River from Eddyville in Pleasant Township, Monroe County. Soon thereafter, the children came to Lagrange in Cedar Township, Lucas County, to live with their brother-in-law and sister, Francis M. and Mary Jane (Kells) Trowbridge. 

Hilas reportedly sustained a shoulder wound on 6 April 1862 during the Battle of Pittsburg Landing (Shiloh) and was transported up the Ohio River to St. John Hospital in Cincinnati for treatment. He died there on either 24 or 26 April 1862 and was buried in what now is Spring Grove National Cemetery.

This soldier's name has proved to be a great challenge to military record-keepers and those in charge of memorializing the fallen. He is buried as "H.L. Kills" in Spring Grove National Cemetery. His inscription on the Evens Cemetery monument, "H. L. Kells," is accurate.



KNIGHT, ALLEN
KRUTSINGER, MARTIN

L

LANE, LOUIS
LARIMER, CYRUS
LISTER, ANDERSON
LYMAN, ENROTAS

M

MAIWALD, JOHN

MALONE, ALKANA, age 54 at enlistment but given falsely as 44, of Chariton, Wagoner, Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, enlisted 28 September 1861, mustered 28 October 1861, killed in action at Shiloh on 6 April 1862. Buried originally with 21 others (13 identifiable, 8 not) southwest of Jack Perry's house on the Shiloh battlefield; relocated to Shiloh National Military Park, Grave No. 485.

Born ca. 1808 in Virginia, Alkana moved as a young man to Ohio and married Elizabeth Freese on 14 July 1831 in Fairfield County. They settled in Guernsey County, then moved to the frontier, Chariton, Lucas County, Iowa, in 1853. Alkana built an hotel, later known as the Hatcher House, and saloon on the square in Chariton and became widely known for some of his exploits. He knocked 10 years off his age in order to enlist as a Wagoner in Co. C on 28 September 1861 in Chariton. His 21-year-old son, Lewis, also enlisted in Co. C on the same date. According to legend, Alkana left his team and wagon on 6 April 1862 as the Battle of Shiloh was about to begin and walked to the area where infantrymen of Co. C were gathered, seized his son's musket and insisted that Lewis remain with the horses and wagon. Alkana entered combat with the infantrymen and was killed by a bullet to the head. Lewis survived. Elizabeth Malone remained a resident of Chariton until her death during 1874. The couple had a dozen children, three of whom died young in Ohio and three of whom died soon after the family located in Chariton. None of the Malone graves in Chariton are marked.

MARSH, ISAAC
MARSH, JAMES


MARTS, PETER (carried as Martz on official records), age 28 at enlistment, of Cedar Township, Lucas County (Lagrange); Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 28 September 1861; mustered 28 October 1861 at Burlington; killed in action (gunshot wound) 22 July 1864, Atlanta, Georgia; disposition of remains unknown.

Peter, son of Charles and Elizabeth (McGill) Marts, was born ca. 1834 in Fayette or Hamilton County, Indiana; and married Rebecca Jane Richards 29 January 1852 in Hamilton County. Peter and Rebecca came to Cedar Township, Lucas County, Iowa, ca. 1856 with her parents, Isaac and Margaret Richards, and other members of that extended family. Peter, Rebecca and their first daughter, Mary, were living with her parents when the 1856 state census of Cedar Township was taken. Rebecca's mother died during 1860 and when the federal census of Cedar Township was taken on June 17, Peter, Rebecca, daughters Mary and Margaret, Isaac Richards and John Riley (relationship unknown) were living in the same household, the men identified as farmers.

Peter was among Lucas County's early enlistees, enrolling at Chariton on 28 September 1861 and mustering at Burlington on 28 October. Although he probably hadn't been discharged, he was listed as such when a census of men of draft age was taken in Cedar Township during June of 1863. Whatever the case, he returned to his unit and served honorably until 22 July 1864 when he was killed in action at Atlanta, struck by a gunshot. The disposition of his remains is unknown. His nephew, young John A. Richards (which see), also was serving in Company C, 13th Iowa, when Peter was killed. He survived only to die of disease on 6 June 1865 at Alexandria, Virginia.

Rebecca married as her second husband Daniel Salyers on 5 February 1865 in Appanoose County and lived there as well as in Missouri before being widowed for a second time ca. 1880. By 1885, Rebecca, daughter Margaret, and her brother, Christopher Richards. were living together --- again in Cedar Township, Lucas County. Margaret died in 1887 and Rebecca, during 1891. Both are buried in Bethel Cemetery where it may be that her mother had been interred in 1860 although there is no marked grave for her there.

MASON, AMOS
MAYDOLE, EDWIN
McDERMOTT, DANIEL
McNEW, CARROLLTON
McPHEETERS, JOSEPH C.
MERCER, JAMES
MERCER, JOHN
MERCER, JOSEPH
MILLER, OLIVER


MITCHELL, DAVID T., age 19 at enlistment, living at Mount Pleasant, home of record Chariton; Private, Co. F, 17th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Mount Pleasant 2 April 1862; mustered 10 April 1862 at Keokuk; died of typhoid fever 13 October 1862; buried as "D.T. Mitchell" in Mound City National Cemetery (Section B, Grave 885); cenotaph in the Chariton Cemetery, Lucas County, Iowa. His brother, James (which see), also died in service during the Civil War.

David, born 12 February 1843 in Monroe County, Indiana, was the youngest son among 13 children of Joseph and Eliza (Henderson) Mitchell. He was about 10 when the entire family moved west to Chariton in Lucas County, Iowa, probably during the fall of 1852, and settled just northwest of town. David's eldest brother, James, died in St. Louis on 8 September 1861 while serving with Co. A, 6th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; and their father died in Chariton on 14 November of the same year. 

David may have been teaching school in Mount Pleasant at the time of his enlistment the following spring. He served honorably with his unit during the siege of Corinth, battle of Iuka and battle of Corinth, all in Mississippi. The family apparently believed for a time that David died of wounds sustained while his unit was engaged in the Battle Corinth on Oct. 3-4, 1862, and is entirely possible that he was wounded there. Official records show, however, that he died of typhoid fever while receiving medical treatment upriver at the military hospital in Mound City, Illinois.

Following the war, David's mother collected a military pension in his name until her own death in Chariton on 28 November 1884.

MITCHELL, JAMES, age 32 at enlistment, of rural Osceola (Clarke County, Iowa); Private, Co. F, 6th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Osceola 1 July 1861, mustered at Burlington 12 or 17 July 1861; died of typhoid fever at St. Louis 6 September 1861; buried Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery (perhaps as J.B. Mitchell, Section 27, Site 6297), cenotaph, Chariton Cemetery, Lucas County, Iowa. His brother, David (which see), also died in service during the Civil War.

James was the second child of Joseph and Eliza (Henderson) Mitchell, born 2 December 1828 in Monroe County, Indiana, where he married Susannah Berry on 27 January 1848. James and Susannah moved west to Lucas County, Iowa, in 1852 with their two oldest children, Joseph C. (born 23 January 1849) and Eliza F. (born 14 October 1851). They settled northwest of Chariton and built a cabin near the current site of the HyVee frozen foods distribution center, where two more children were born, John M. Berry Mitchell on 15 January 1854 and Bennett H. Mitchell, on 3 March 1856.

During late 1856, apparently, the family moved to a farm one county west near Osceola in Clarke County, where they were living when the 1860 federal census was taken and when James was among the first to enlist for Civil War service on 1 July 1861. He was mustered at Burlingon on 12 or 17 July 1861 and transported downriver from Keokuk to St. Louis with his unit on 9 August. He became ill with typhoid fever and died at St. Louis on 6 September.

Susannah (born 11 August 1827 in Lincoln County, Kentucky) did not remarry and continued to live at Osceola until her death on 16 December 1902. She is buried in Maple Grove Cemetery there with her daughter, Eliza Mitchell, and son John M.B. Mitchell. Her son, Joseph C., became an attorney and practiced in Chariton for 20 years before relocating to Ottumwa. He died in 1918 and is buried in the Chariton Cemetery.

MOORE, LITTLETON
MUNDELL, SOLOMON
MUSSELMAN, JOHN S.

N

NETTLETON, SAMUEL

O

OVERTON, JOSEPH

P

PARR, DAVID


PAYNE, JONATHAN C., age 27 at enlistment and a resident of LaGrange, corporal (promoted to full sergeant), Co. I, 8th Iowa Volunteer Infantry (a company raised largely in Monroe County); enlisted 10 August 1861 at LaGrange; mustered 12 September 1861 at Burlington; captured by Confederate forces 6 April 1862 during the Battle of Shiloh; imprisoned at Macon, Georgia; exchanged November 1861; died apparently of disease in St. Louis on 18 March 1863. Buried among the unknowns at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery; commemorated in Allen Cemetery, Cedar Township, Lucas County.

Jonathan was born ca. 1833 in Owen County, Indiana, to Samuel and Nancy (Craddick) Payne. Samuel (Lucas County's first sheriff) and Nancy (whose death during August 1849 is the first of a permanent settler recorded in the county; buried Greenville Cemetery) brought Jonathan and his sister, Sarah, to Lucas County during 1848 or May of 1849. A carpenter by trade, Jonathan married Lucy M.S. Olmsted on 12 March 1854 and they settled in Chariton where Lucy have birth to a son, Charles, ca. 1858, then died. Jonathan married as his second wife Angeline Turner on 17 February 1860 and they settled in the village of LaGrange, near the farm of her parents. Their son, James H., was born there during 1861. 

Jonathan enlisted as corporal, but was promoted to full sergeant on 31 March 1862, just before the deadly Battle of Shiloh. Although he survived Shiloh, he was captured by Confederate forces on 6 April 1862 --- along with most surviving troops of his regiment --- and imprisoned until November of that year in Macon, Georgia, when the Iowa prisoners were exchanged. Apparently too ill to rejoin his unit, Jonathan died at St. Louis, perhaps taken from a northbound transport ship to a military hospital. His remains would have been buried in the city of St. Louis, but apparently were unidentifiable when moved after the war to Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. A commemorative tombstone was erected soon after his death on the Turner family lot in Allen Cemetery. 

The widowed Angeline (Turner) Payne married Spencer Hardy, an older widower with children, on 7 November 1864 and they became the parents of six children in rapid succession prior to his death on 22 September 1872, near Melrose. By 1880, Angeline had moved her family to Harrison County, Missouri. She died 17 March 1902 in Placer County, California. Son James Payne still was living in 1880 but hasn't been traced beyond that year. What became of Jonathan's son, Charles, isn't known.

PHILLIPS, DANIEL
PLYMATE, BENONIA
POSTON, NEWTON
POWERS, COOPER
POWERS, PETER
PRATHER, ANDREW

R

RAGSDALE, GABRIEL
RARIDEN, JAMES
RATLIFF, JAMES
REYNOLDS, FRANCIS


RICHARDS, JOHN A., age 18 at enlistment, of Cedar Township; Private, Company C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 29 March 1864; mustered at Davenport 18 April 1864; died 6 June 1865 at Slough General Hospital, Alexandria, Virginia, of acute dysentery; buried Alexandria National Cemetery (Section B, Site 3001).

John, born ca. 1846 in Hamilton County, Indiana, was a son of Christopher and Sarah Jane (Hackleman) Richards, who arrived in what now is the Bethel Cemetery neighborhood of Cedar Township ca. 1856 with his parents and older siblings, Mary and Lewis. In 1860, when John was 14, his father abandoned the family, eloping with a woman described later as "a strumpet from Peoria." Sister Mary had by this time married Thomas N. Goltry, in 1858, and older brother, Lewis, had left home. That left John as the sole support of his mother. In order to support her, he worked out while living at home and then, after enlistment soon after his 18th birthday, gave her his enlistment premium and forwarded to her a substantial share of his military wages.

John survived a number of the 13th's great engagements late in the war, including the advance on and capture of Atlanta, Sherman's March to the Sea, capture of Savannah and the march through the Carolinas. The 13th arrived in Alexandria, Virginia, on 19 May, 1865, and joined the triumphant march down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., a few days later. John, however was ill, and soon was hospitalized with acute dysentery at Slough General Hospital in Alexandria, where he died on June 6. His remains were interred in what now is the Alexandria National Cemetery.

Back in Lucas County, John's mother received a pension in John's name and continued to live with or near the family of her daughter and son-in-law, Mary and Thomas N. Goltry, through 1880. Soon after 1880, the Goltrys moved west to Mills County, Iowa. It isn't known if Sarah accompanied them or if she had died previously in Lucas County. 

By 1891, Christopher, after a considerable career of hooking up with and/or marrying a series of women, was back in Cedar Township, living with his sister, Rebecca Salyers, whose first husband had been Peter Marts (which see), also a Civil War fatality. After her death in 1891, he returned to Indiana and died there on 9 May 1905. He is buried in Arcadia Cemetery, Hamilton County, Indiana.

ROACH, JAMES
ROBERTS, REUBEN
ROBERTS, THOMAS
ROLAND, LUTHER
RONEY, GRAHAM
ROSEMAN, MARTIN
RUNYAN, HUGH

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SAMS, GEORGE
SAMS, SIMON
SCHWORM, GEORGE
SEWARD, JOHN
SHEETS, WILLIAM
SLAGLE, ADAM
SPURLING, JAMES H.
STANLEY, JOHN
STEVENS, ABRAHAM
STONEKING, LEWIS
STORY, TRUMAN
SUMMERS, ELIJAH

T

THRELKELD, OLIVER


Steve Hanken
TULL, WILLIAM D
., age 24 at enlistment, of Lucas County, Private, Co. B, 6th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 1 July 1861; mustered 17 July 1861; died of wounds 18 May 1864 at Resaca, Georgia; buried Chattanoona National Cemetery, Section K, Site 10003.

William D. Tull has, to date, not been linked to any of Lucas County's Tull families, or found in pre-Civil War records of the county. He was critically wounded on 14 May 1864 during the Battle of Resaca, Georgia, the first major engagement of the Atlanta campaign. As many as 2,800 union and 2,800 Confederate forces died during that three-day engagement. William died on 18 May 1864 of gunshot wounds and was buried on the battlefield, located some 25 miles southeast of Chattanooga, Tennessee, and 75 miles northwest of Atlanta. After the war, his remains were relocated with those of all other Union KIA to the Chattanooga National Cemetery.

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VAN METER, ALEXANDER, age 18 at enlistment, Private, Co. K, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 2 August 1862 at Chariton; mustered 15 October 1862; discharged for disability 20 April 1863 at St. Louis; died 4 May 1863 at Chariton; first burial in the Veterans' Section, Chariton Cemetery.

Alexander, son of Miles and Nancy (Phillips) Van Meter (alternatively VanMeter or Vanmeter), was born ca. 1844 in Illinois, perhaps in or near Jasper County, where his parents were married on 21 November 1842. Ca. 1848, Miles and Nancy brought Alexander and his sister, Hannah, to Lucas County, Iowa, settling in English Township, near Chariton. A son, Lewis, was born ca. 1849. Miles was active in and around Chariton during the early 1850s, helping to survey and plat Chariton during April-May 1850, running for constable in April 1851 and voting in a February, 1852, election. A second Iowa-born son, Eli, arrived on April 14, 1852. Miles seems to have died soon thereafter, as did little Lewis. When the 1856 state census and the 1860 federal census were taken, Nancy, a widow, headed a household that included her children Alexander, Hannah and Eli. Nancy married an older widower, John Daniels, on 14 August 1862, 12 days after her son had enlisted, and moved to his home in Whitebreast Township.

Alexander apparently became critically during the spring of 1863 and was discharged for disability in St. Louis on 20 April. He made it home to Chariton, where he died on 4 May. His burial was the first in the Veterans' Section of the new Chariton Cemetery (his father and little brother most likely had been buried in what now is Douglass Pioneer Cemetery). John Daniels died at 71 on 25 August 1868, leaving Nancy widowed for a second time. Between 1870 and 1880, Nancy and her two surviving children, Hanna (now married) and Eli, moved to the vicinity of Beloit, Mitchell County, Kansas, where Nancy died at age 80 on 16 March 1902. She and Eli are buried in Pleasant Valley Cemetery near Beloit.


VINCENT, JAMES

W

WAGONER, JAMES, age 34 at enlistment, of Whitebreast Township, Private, Co. E, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 9 August 1862 in Chariton, mustered 15 October 1862 at Camp Lauman, Burlington; died of disease 3 March 1863 in St. Louis; buried Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Section 38, Grave 198.

James was a native of Ohio who married Permelia Sydbotham on 24 December 1858, then settled on a small farm in Whitebreast Township, near where Oakley now is located, soon thereafter. They became the parents of three children in quick succession --- Ira, born 1859; Mary "Molly," born 1860; and John J., Born 1861. The widowed Permelia married Frederick F. Barlow in Lucas County on 24 April 1864. They had a son, Stanton C. Barlow, but the marriage did not endure; Permelia resumed use of the surname "Wagoner"; and Frederick died at Beloit, Kansas, during 1880. Permelia lived in Chariton with her three Wagoner children, none of whom married, until her death on 5 February 1907. The children continued to live together thereafter, dying as follows: Mary in 1924; Ira in 1929; and John in 1930. All are buried in the Chariton Cemetery.

WARFORD, SIMEON B., age 22 at enlistment, Private, Co. D, 8th Iowa Volunteer Cavalry; enlisted at Chariton 14 August 1863; died of consumption 29 April or 1 March 1864 (records conflict) at Nashville, Tennessee; buried Nashville National Cemetery, Section H, Site 10035.

Simeon, born ca. 1841 in Jackson County, Ohio, was a son of Lot Warford and his second wife, Sibyl Briggs. The family moved from Ohio to Liberty Township, Clarke County, ca. 1854, and Simeon was enumerated as a member of his father's household in both the 1856 state census and 1860 federal census of Clarke County. Liberty Township is adjacent to northwest Lucas County's Otter Creek Township. Simeon apparently was living in Lucas County at the time of his enlistment in Chariton on 14 August 1863. He died of consumption on either 29 April or 1 May 1864 at Cumberland General Hospital (generally believed to have been a field hospital) at Nashville, Tennessee. He was buried initially in the U.S. Burial Ground - Southwest City Cemetery, Nashville, then reburied in Nashville National Cemetery upon its establishment.

WATERHOUSE, WILLIAM HENRY, age 19 at enlistment (some records show 29, but he was only 19), of Chariton, 4th Sergeant, Co. K, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 8 August 1862; mustered 15 October 1862; died of disease in St. Louis, Missouri, on 22 March 1863; buried (presumably) among the unknowns at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

William, a son of George and Massey Waterhouse, was born about 1843 at Walton on Thames, Surry, England, and grew up in the village of Cranford, Middlesex, where his father was a watch manufacturer. About 1852, the Waterhouse family emigrated to Dubuque County, Iowa, where the father died almost immediately, on Nov. 28, at Cascade. Soon after 1860, William came to Chariton to live with his sister, Emily, who had married Joseph Braden during 1854. William's remains most likely were unidentifiable when relocated to Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

Doris Christensen
WAYLAND, ELIJAH M.,
age 21 at enlistment, of Chariton, Private, Co. E, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 9 August 1862; mustered 15 October 1862; died of wounds 1 July 1863 at Vicksburg, Mississippi; buried among the unknowns at Vicksburg National Cemetery; commemorated on the tombstone of his twin brother, Austin, in the Chariton Cemetery.

Elijah was a son of Joseph (1784-1851) Wayland and his second wife, Patsy Threlkeld. Elijah and his twin brother, Austin S., were born on 13 April 1841 in Johnson County, Indiana. Following Joseph's death, Patsy brought her children west to Lucas County, Iowa, where many members of the extended Threlkeld family also settled. When the 1860 federal census of Lucas County was taken, Elijah was living in Benton Township with Keziah and Holmes Rowland and their two small children. Elijah's commanding officer, Capt. Nelson B. Gardner, also of Chariton, testified by sworn affidavit dated 28 March 1864 that Elijah's right leg was shot off on 1 July "by the explosion of a shell thrown from the enemy's battery at the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi," and that he died the same day from effects of the wounds. Elijah is buried among the unknowns at Vickburg, but is commemorated on the tombstone of his brother, Austin, who died during 1877, in the Chariton Cemetery.

WEAVER, JOHN W., age 23 at enlistment, of Cedar Township, Private, Co. B, 6th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 2 October 1861; mustered 24 October 1861; killed in action 6 April 1862 during the Battle of Shiloh. Buried among the unknowns, Shiloh National Military Park; commemorated on tombstone in Allen Cemetery, Cedar Township, Lucas County.

John was a son of George and Harriet (Yergey) Weaver, who brought their family of four children from Pickaway County, Ohio, to Cedar Township, Lucas County, Iowa, in 1851. John, born 21 December 1837 in Pickaway County, was living and farming with his family when both the 1856 state and 1860 federal census enumerations of Lucas County were taken. George died 12 September 1869, age 53, in Cedar Township and was buried in Allen Cemetery. During 1876, Harriet married Hugh Larimer, but he pre-deceased her, too, during 1884. Harriet died 10 January 1901, age 84, and was buried beside George in the Allen Cemetery.

WEBB, SAMUEL



WELLS, JESSE, age 20 at enlistment, of Otter Creek Township, Private, Co. C, 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted at Chariton 28 September 1861; mustered 28 October 1861; killed in combat on 6 April 1862 during the Battle of Shiloh; remains, buried first on the battlefield, presumably were reburied with the unknowns at Shiloh National Military Park. Jesse is commemorated on a stone at Clore-Wells Pioneer Cemetery, Otter Creek Township, shared with his elder half-brother, Silas, who also died while in Civil War service.

Jesse, a son of John and Ruth (Huffman) Wells, was born Jan. 17, 1842, in Monroe County, Ohio, and settled in Otter Creek Township, Lucas County, Iowa, at age 14 during 1856 with his family. He was living with his parents in Otter Creek township when both the Iowa 1856 and federal 1860 census enumerations were made. 


WELLS, SILAS, age 24 at enlistment, Second Corporal, Co. K, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 9 August 1862; mustered 15 October 1862; promoted to full Corporal; became critically ill before deployment to the front and was sent home to Otter Creek Township to recover or die. He died on 3 November 1862 and his remains were buried in Clore-Wells Pioneer Cemetery. His younger half-brother, Jesse, killed at Shiloh on 6 April 1862 and buried there, also is commemorated on his tombstone.

Silas, a son of John and Susannah (McBride) Wells, was born 7 February 1838 in Monroe County, Ohio. His mother died when he was an infant and during 1840, his father married Ruth W. Huffman. Most of the large Wells family, including Silas, settled in Otter Creek Township, Lucas County, Iowa, during 1855-56. Silas was living with his brother, Aaron, sister-in-law, Elizabeth, and niece, Lydia E., during 1856; in 1860, he was enumerated as head of the household of his widowed sister, Christina Curtis, and her family.

WESTON, CYRENUS L., age 25 at enlistment, of Warren Township, Private, Co. G, 34th Iowa Volunteer Infantry; enlisted 12 August 1862; mustered 15 October 1862; died of disease 11 February 1863 at St. Louis, Missouri; buried Section 50, Site No. 633, Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

Cyrenus, a native of Pennsylvania, was farming in Warren Township, Lucas County, when the 1860 federal census was taken; living with his wife, Jane (Moore) Weston, and son, James W.L. Weston, age 5 months on the date of enumeration, 14 July. The widowed Jane married Ransom Alden on 14 June 1863 in Lucas County and pension records suggest that James may have taken his stepfather's surname. The family was living south of Seymour in Wayne County, Iowa, when Ransom died on 29 January 1874 (according to transcribed Wayne County cemetery records) or 29 January 1877 (according to online family records). He was buried in Harris Cemetery there. Later census records state that Jane gave birth to a total of nine children, three of whom were living in 1920, just before her death. Jane seems to have spent the later part of her life with her daughter, Angeline (b. 1868) and son-in-law, Grant Johnson. The Johnsons (and Jane) were living in Appanoose County, Iowa, in 1900; in Monroe County, Iowa, in 1910; and by 1920 had moved to Columbia County, New York. Jane died 6 August 1921 in Columbia County and is buried in Gallatin Reformed Church Cemetery in that county.

WHEELER, FRANCIS
WHITE, JAMES W.
WILLIAMS, JOHN
WILLIAMS, SAMUEL
WILSON, ALLEN
WISE, WILLIAM

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